Summer Chore Chart For Kids

As a parent, you know that there are always plenty of chores that could use some help around the house. However, getting your children to do them can be challenging sometimes. Which is why making a checklist for everyone really helps.

Here’s how my kids and I set up our chore chart system and there is a free blank download for you too!

girl folding socks with her mother while sitting on floor
Photo by Ron Lach on Pexels.com

If you’re in the market for a summer chore chart, it’s important to keep in mind that not all chores are created equal. The skills required to complete different tasks can depend on your child’s age and ability. A toddler might be able to clean up their toys and help with some basic household chores, but they may not be able to do other things like fold laundry or empty the dishwasher just yet.

You have to consider how much time each activity will take for your child: The more time-consuming a task is, the less likely it is that your preschooler will have time during the day to complete it —which means they might end up doing nothing at all!

So when setting up an age-appropriate chore chart for kids under 5 years old, focus on activities like picking up toys and putting them away in bins—these tasks don’t take long at all and don’t require too much skill or strength either.

to do list procrastination quote
Photo by Annie Spratt on Pexels.com

But in our house, we start everyone off with a morning chore: Make your bed!

Benefits: This easy task can be done in a jiffy, and teaches children the value of cleanliness. We have done this one with our kids since they were babies. They learn to feel good about themselves when they see their room looking neat and tidy. And even though it is become part of their routine now, we still like to put it on the list. It feels good to get that checked off first thing in the morning.

Here is our list and a blank copy for you to download/ print. Have fun with it.

TIP: Order these dry erase pockets from Amazon, print one chore chart, and have the kids use dry erase markers to check off the list. Easy to do and clean. This will save you time and money in the long run.

Chores don’t always have to mean vacuuming or washing the dishes. It can be something as simple as reading a book or playing outside. The goal is to give kids some responsibility over their time and give them a sense of ownership in their home—but make sure it’s something they can do without your help.

Until next time, have a wonderful summer break and check out our last chore chart!

x, Dijana

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